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Soft puffy rotis stacked on a plate

Soft Rotis - How to make them at home

Making soft rotis at home only needs two ingredients - atta (wholemeal wheat flour) and water. From kneading the dough to rolling them out and cooking them, the entire process takes approx 10-15 minutes with some resting time in between. Once you master this skill, homemade bread is never far away!
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Course: How To, Side Dishes
Cuisine: Indian, North Indian
Keyword: chapati, how to make rotis, phulka, rotli, soft rotis
Prep Time: 8 minutes
Cook Time: 2 minutes
Total Time: 10 minutes
Servings: 12 rotis
Calories: 89kcal
Author: Richa

Ingredients

  • 2 1/2 cups Atta / Wholemeal Wheat Flour set aside 1/4 cup flour for dusting
  • 3/4 cup Water lukewarm (approx)
  • 1-2 teaspoon Ghee to smear on rotis

Instructions

  • To make the dough, place the flour in the center of a wide mouthed bowl or a plate with a high rim. Make a well in the center and add 1/4 cup water. With your fingers, mix the water and flour together; add another 1/4 cup water and mix. Do the same thing again till the dough starts to roughly come together. If the dough is too dry, add a teaspoon of water at a time. Once the dough comes together, start kneading the dough, alternating between your palms and your knuckles. Press it down with your palm, pull it with your fingers and then pull it back. Use your knuckles to press down on the dough, making indentations and repeat till the dough is soft and pliable. This should take 3-4 minutes. I like adding a few drops of water and kneading and i repeat this process 2-3 times.
  • Once the dough is ready, cover it with a barely damp cloth and rest it for 15-20 minutes.
  • While you roll the dough, put a tava on the stove and let it pre-heat. To roll the dough, take a small lime sized piece of dough and smoothen it into a ball between your palms. Place it on a rolling board or the kitchen counter and gently press it down to flatten it. Now dust the dough gently with dry atta and start rolling it. Move the rolling pin along the length, pressing gently as you go. If your roti feels sticky at any point, dust it with some dry flour. Keep rotating the roti in a circular motion and rolling till its approx 5-5.5 inches in diameter and is evenly rolled out.
  • Make sure the tawa or skillet has heated evenly before you start cooking rotis. It should be hot, but not smoking. Place the roti in the center of the tawa. Wait till you see bubbles on the surface. Once the bubbles form, flip the roti. Once you see bubbles on the other side, use a pair of tongs to flip again and transfer the roti to an open flame. In less than 5 seconds, you'll start to see the roti puff up. Flip again to cook the other side, and remove from the heat. If your roti doesn't puff up, don't worry, just cook it till you see brown spots.
  • While they are still hot, smear the rotis with ghee so that it melts. Stack them one on top of the other. The residual heat, keeps them soft, and prevents them from drying out.
  • Make sure the tawa or skillet has heated evenly before you start cooking rotis. It should be hot, but not smoking. Place the roti in the center of the tawa. Wait till you see bubbles on the surface. Once the bubbles form, flip the roti. Once the bubble form on this side, take a soft cloth or towel and start pressing down lightly on the roti, rotating it as you go. It will start puffing up as you press. Roti is cooked when you see light brown spots on both sides. Smear it with ghee or butter while it's still hot, and serve immediately.

Notes

  • Water: Different brands of water soak up different amounts of water. Increase or reduce the water by a tablespoon or two if required
  • Storing the dough: The dough can be stored in an airtight container in the fridge for up to two days. The colour might darken slightly, but that doesn't mean the dough is spoiled. Don't use the dough if it starts to smell sour.
  • Substitutes for water: The dough can also be kneaded with milk, whey or vegetable stock. Different people prefer different liquid for kneading.
  • Multigrain Atta: Using multigrain atta might result in crisper, slightly denser rotis that may not be as soft. Plain, whole wheat flour produces the softest rotis
  • Freezing rotis: Plain rotis (without ghee) can be frozen up to 3 months by stacking them on top of the other with a layer of parchment paper in between them. I've detailed this process below the recipe card.
  • Storing cooked rotis: Cooked rotis, smeared with ghee, can be stored, wrapped in a soft cloth or aluminium foil outside for a day. I prefer storing them in an airtight container on the kitchen counter. We even snack on them during the day.

Nutrition

Calories: 89kcal | Carbohydrates: 18g | Protein: 3g | Fat: 1g | Saturated Fat: 1g | Cholesterol: 1mg | Sodium: 1mg | Potassium: 91mg | Fiber: 3g | Sugar: 1g | Calcium: 9mg | Iron: 1mg